kellyschreckengost

October 16, 2012

Blogical Discussion

Filed under: Uncategorized — by kschreckengost @ 2:54 am

This past week I did some research into what technologies are available for the Speech-Language Pathologist. I had recently written to a classmate of mine and commented on how technology has exploded in the past 10 years. In graduate school, we were still using the tape recorder to capture live speech from our clients. Today, most people have smart phones in their pockets that allow them to capture the voice and store it in an MP3 format. It’s become almost effortless to obtain a quick articulation or language sample when needed.

During my perusing of information, I came across an older blog post from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) talking about blogging and podcasting for the SLP. This blog post was written by a talented trilingual SLP named Barbara Fernandes. One of Barabara’s accomplishments is a series of podcasts/vodcasts/screencasts that can be found at  Geek SLP TV. I am really excited to find these resources. Barbara does a remarkable job explaining how to use technology and incorporate it into the therapy needs of the SLP. If you are an Apple user, Barbara has a series of informative tutorials on how to use Apple technologies. She provides some PC info as well.

Barbara is also the director and owner of a company called Smarty Ears, which develops all sorts of SLP, teacher, and parent apps that can be downloaded through the iTunes store. It is worth it to check out these resources. And although I need to look into this more, she has an app called the Sunny Articulation Test that is supposed to be a wonderful tool for the school based SLP. I’ll be checking into that later.

While looking through all of this information, it sparked a great idea for a blogical discussion. Why not see how many useful resources we can find and post to this discussion page? Even though we are educators with different backgrounds, it never hurts to have a vast array of resources to pull from. When you tell us about your favorite resource or resources, please include a link and give us all a description of what to use it for, why you chose it, and why you like it so much. At the end of the week, I’ll comprise a summary page and we’ll all have it to keep! Getting excited about starting this :) Talk with you all very soon.

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13 Comments »

  1. I will say, honestly, one of my greatest resources these days is twitter. The SLPs (hundreds of them) there are wonderful. I can discuss evaluation results, get ideas for goals, discuss problems, and connect with many different people (not just celebrities).

    Using twitter as a primary learning network has increased my skills as a clinician a great deal. I’ve been able to share my knowledge with others – which is always nice…but I’ve connected and learned from so many people as well. When an SLP posts a new blog post about a new therapy activity – it gets tweeted… If someone has a new article link – it gets tweeted. If some one has taken a fabulous class at speechtherapy.com – it gets tweeted.
    Truly, the SLPs on twitter are an incredible wealth of information and therapy ideas.

    Comment by Mary Huston, MS, CCC-SLP — October 16, 2012 @ 2:05 pm |Reply

  2. Since I teach Social Science, I have looked for tools that will help me to enhance the online experience as well as the blended learning experience. One of the first things that I looked for in my online class was to set up some type of discussion board. I found a site that is easy to use and very friendly for both students and teachers. Collaborize Classroom is a great way to start and easily maintain a discussion board: http://www.collaborizeclassroom.com/.

    I use this in my high school online courses in American Government, Economics, and U.S. History. I will post a topic and students will post and respond to two other student posts, they also have to submit a one page typed essay on the subject expanding on their discussion post.

    Another tool that I have found very useful is http://www.popplet.com.
    Student use this to connect historical information and do presentation on topics we discuss in class.

    I have been able to share these and other resources with our staff.

    Comment by robertreedut11 — October 19, 2012 @ 3:27 am |Reply

    • Robert, I second your suggested resources! Thanks for sharing them.

      Collaborize Classroom is a great tool for the traditional classroom teacher, homeschooler, and the SLP.

      Collaborize Classroom is a wonderful resource for sharing information. I know that a lot of homeschool educators use this site to keep in touch between organized homeschool co-op meetings. It’s a convenient place to post questions to get students involved in discussions. I personally appreciate the weekly update that is available to record a student’s progress.

      Popplet is also very popular among many educators. It is a VERY creative program and a wonderful tool. Check out a previous review that highlights the benefits of popplet at http://www.speechtechie.com/2011/05/popplet-day.html.

      Comment by kschreckengost — October 20, 2012 @ 2:01 am |Reply

    • Sorry Robert for using Marc’s named in my first reply! That’s what happens when you have the group wiki on the brain as well as everything else! I corrected the post. Thanks again. :)

      Comment by kschreckengost — October 20, 2012 @ 2:08 am |Reply

  3. Hi, Kelly! What a great idea. I think we will be sharing some other fun tools in another module, so maybe we will have already done an assignment. Over the summer when everyone was wondering when I would have my baby, my husband found a great app called Everyme. (I don’t know if it will recognize this as a hyperlink in the comment section, but it never hurts to try it out.

    Anyway, this was a forum based type of app. Mike (my husband) set it up so that messages could be sent to family/friends email/app/text. As we moved along into labor, he was able to make updates. Soon after Sylvie was born he was able to post pictures. Then, throughout the first few months, he was able to continue to post pictures so that people could see. It was a bit more intimate than facebook, but it had the same gist–anyone could comment or post to our group.

    That said, I talked to my principal about the possibility of using it or something like it Glassboard: http://glassboard.com/. For example, if we have a great discussion going in my class about a particular novel, we might want to continue the discussion or do a little research to add to what we have said. If the students have the app, or access to the program, it could be very similar to our forum in class. I’m still in the process of working out bugs that could arise with these programs, however.

    Comment by jennhund — October 20, 2012 @ 9:07 pm |Reply

    • Hi Jenn! Thank you for adding Everyme and Glassboard to our discussion list. I was not familiar with either of these applications before you listed them today. I am still hesitant to set up a Facebook account, but sometimes wish that I had somewhere to turn to post info to close family and friends. Everyme and Glassboard seem to be great sites for that. What I like the most about these apps is that they are always private. What a great selling point and a super option for incorporating into the classroom.

      Comment by kelly schreckengot — October 21, 2012 @ 3:15 am |Reply

  4. So I decided to take a different approach to this. I started to search for tools that I could use in my classroom and I was going to pick just one. instead, I found Cool Tools for Schools at http://cooltoolsforschools.wikispaces.com/Collaborative+Tools and it has so many suggestions for Web 2.0 apps you could use in any classroom. Some of the tools are very intriguing, such as Thinkature for instant messaging and some of them I will admit to being confused about, such as self destructable text notes. Many of these ideas could be very useful in any classroom setting.

    Comment by dawnlfrye — October 21, 2012 @ 1:36 am |Reply

    • Wow, thanks Dawn for including the entire wikispaces page in your post! I checked out Thinkature and did you see that you can create, move, edit, and connect with colleagues in real time without downloading any apps? It works right in your open browser. This is definitely something I’d like to look into further. You can even draw right on the screen. I am already starting to imagine the possibilities with this one!

      Comment by kelly schreckengot — October 21, 2012 @ 3:23 am |Reply

  5. Marc was unable to get his comment to post to our discussion so here is a copy of what he left in the forum:

    One site that I use with my graphics classes is http://www.dafont.com. This site offers thousands of free fonts. When creating a graphics project, font choice is important and the ones that come with computer programs are not always enough.

    Another site I use is http://www.good-tutorials.com. It has different tutorials on Photoshop functions. If a student has a question, he can go to this site to help find the answer.

    Comment by kschreckengost — October 23, 2012 @ 1:49 am |Reply

    • Marc, you don’t know how many times I’ve needed a certain type of font and didn’t have access to it. I just checked out http://www.dafont.com. This is super. I had no idea free fonts were available online. This is a great education link for teachers and students.

      The link to the Photoshop tutorials is great too. I can’t tell you how many times this would have benefited me. I know that there are ALOT more functions in that program for me to take advantage of, but yet I don’t use them because I don’t feel comfortable. The online tutorials are great for the novice who needs a little help. Thanks!

      Comment by kschreckengost — October 23, 2012 @ 2:13 am |Reply

  6. Clair was unable to get her comment to post to our discussion so here is a copy of what she left in the forum:

    With over 600,000 apps for iPads, iPods and iPhones in the iTunes store it can be a bit of a challenge to find the right app to do the task or teach the material you want to explore. If you start searching the web for app reviews you find there seems to be as many review sites as there are apps! I’ve been looking at this for quite some time and decided I needed my own listing of sites that I liked. Rather than put it into Diigo or just keep a listing in my bookmarks, I decided to create a little website using Google sites. From there I’ve pulled my top 5 review sites. I hope you find something useful in these…

    BridgingApps has a live connection to the iTunes app store database. Consequently when new apps arrive or apps and their descriptions are updated, their search tool automatically has access to the new information. They have developed a powerful search tool that allows you to set parameters for the app you want and then pull up apps based on those parameters. Can’t say enough good things about their search tool. ( bridgingapps.org )

    ‘AppAdvice’ Well organized app listings and reviews; apps, apps and more apps. Did I mention apps? Check out the “iOS Apps Gone Free” link to see the daily listing of apps that are free for the short term. AppAdvice also has its own app called AppsGoneFree for the iPad, iPod and iPhone. Everyday AppsGoneFree will alert you to a list of apps that are free for a short period of time, sometimes for only one day. You will see the list of apps, descriptions and links to the App Store. ( appadvice.com )

    ‘APPitic’ An excellent site with reviews built on a 5-star scale. To quote the site, “APPitic is a directory of apps for education by Apple Distinguished Educators (ADEs) to help you transform teaching and learning. These apps have been tested in a variety of different grade levels, instructional strategies and classroom settings.” Additionally apps are listed within collections: NEW, SpEd and Autism, PreSchool, Themes, Multiple Intelligences, Bloom’s Taxonomy, ISTE NETS and Teachers. ( appitic.com )

    ‘Technology in (Spl) Education’ “The place to learn about Technology in Education” Be sure to check out the drop-down menu on the right that lists “Apps/Resources by IEP Goals/Skills”; FREE apps; Discounted apps ( techinspecialed.com )

    ‘Mind Leap: Education Apps for Kids’ has apps categorized by grade level: Preschool, Kindergarten, 1st Grade, 2nd Grade, 3rd Grade, 4th Grade, 5th Grade and Middle School; Each grade is subdivided into subject areas, such as: Language Arts, Math, Science and Technology, Foreign Language, Music, Art and/or Social Studies, as appropriate for that grade. An excellent site with reviews built on a 5-star scale ( http://www.mindleaptech.com )

    Comment by kschreckengost — October 23, 2012 @ 1:52 am |Reply

    • Oh my Claire! You have made my day. Super list of resources! Let me tell you how many hours I have spent researching apps on the app store. I am not an impulsive buyer and try to find the most bang for my buck. I have checked out all of the resources you listed. I can’t wait to use them all. This is my favorite quote from appadvice.com, “Don’t let the success of your app purchases be based on chance.” I know most of us can relate to this, we search and search and review and then after our head is spinning we purchase and cross our fingers and hope for the best. It will be nice to have some of the work done for us.

      Comment by kschreckengost — October 23, 2012 @ 2:43 am |Reply

  7. Well, what a week. Thanks to all of you who have contributed to this week’s discussion. We have a really great database for resources. Marc and Claire, thanks for hanging in there when the blog comments wouldn’t post. :)

    As I promised at the beginning of the week, here is a comprehensive list of educational resources. I’ve had the opportunity to check out each one of the sites listed and there is not one that won’t come in handy for me. I’m sure you’ll find that out as well. Here we go!

    1. Collaborize Classroom (www.collaborizeclassroom.com)
    In Robert’s words, collaborize classroom is a “great way to start and easily maintain a discussion board.”

    2. Popplet (www.popplet.com)
    Robert states that this a good way to connect information and do presentations on topics that are discussed in class. Check out this review for more ways to use popplet: http://www.speechtechie.com/2011/05/popplet-day.html.

    3. Everyme (www.everyme.com)
    Jenn states that this is a forum based app. Messages can be sent via email/app/text. She said that everyme is more intimate than facebook, but has the same gist–anyone can comment or post to a group. Bonus: This site is always private.

    4. Glassboard (www.glassboard.com)
    Jenn also shared this site. The glassboard website states that this is a great site to share messages, photos, videos, files and even locations with different groups: family, friends, co-workers, classmates, volunteers, and more. Bonus: This site is always private.

    5. Cool Tools for Schools (http://cooltoolsforschools.wikispaces.com/Collaborative+Tools)
    Dawn shared this wiki that has a myriad of tools to check out. I suggest, as Dawn also did, to check out the link for Thinkature. Thinkature allows you to create, move, edit, and connect with colleagues in real time without downloading any apps. It works right in an open browser.

    6. Dafont (www.dafont.com)
    Marc shared that this is a great site to find special fonts that aren’t a part of the basic computer software program. The best part is that the downloads are free!

    7. Good-Tutorials (http://www.good-tutorials.com)
    Marc stated that this is a great site for tutorials on Photoshop functions.

    8. Bridging Apps (bridgingapps.org)
    Claire shared that this is “a powerful search tool that allows you to set parameters for the app you want and then pull up apps based on those parameters.”

    9. AppAdvice (www.appadvice.com)
    Claire stated that “AppAdvice has its own app called AppsGoneFree for the iPad, iPod and iPhone. Everyday AppsGoneFree will alert you to a list of apps that are free for a short period of time, sometimes for only one day. You will see the list of apps, descriptions and links to the App Store.”

    10. APPitic (www.appitic.com)
    Claire shared that this is an excellent site with reviews built on a 5-star scale. To quote the site, APPitic is a directory of apps for education by Apple Distinguished Educators (ADEs) to help you transform teaching and learning. These apps have been tested in a variety of different grade levels, instructional strategies and classroom settings.” Additionally apps are listed within collections: NEW, SpEd and Autism, PreSchool, Themes, Multiple Intelligences, Bloom’s Taxonomy, ISTE NETS and Teachers.

    11. Technology in (Spl) Education (www.techinspecialed.com)
    Claire stated that this is the place to learn about Technology in Education. She said to be sure to check out the drop-down menu on the right that lists “Apps/Resources by IEP Goals/Skills”; FREE apps; Discounted apps.

    12. Mind Leap: Education Apps for Kids (www.mindleaptech.com)
    Claire shared that this site has apps categorized by grade level: Preschool, Kindergarten, 1st Grade, 2nd Grade, 3rd Grade, 4th Grade, 5th Grade and Middle School. Each grade is subdivided into subject areas, such as: Language Arts, Math, Science and Technology, Foreign Language, Music, Art and/or Social Studies, as appropriate for that grade. An excellent site with reviews built on a 5-star scale.

    13. Geek SLP TV (www.geekslp.com)
    I listed this site because it has a series of informative tutorials on how to use Apple technologies. Some PC info is provided as well.

    14. Smarty Ears (www.smartyearsapps.com)
    I listed this site because they develop all sorts of SLP, teacher, and parent apps that can be downloaded through the iTunes store. Great resources for articulation and language. The Sunny Articulation Test is highly recommended.

    Comment by kschreckengost — October 23, 2012 @ 3:38 am |Reply


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